IssuesNews

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice

On Saturday, the news broke Supreme Court Justice, Antonin Scalia, died at his Texas ranch at the age of 79. With a seat on the country’s highest court now vacant, many are calling for President Obama to make history and appoint a Black woman to the Supreme Court.

But what women should be on the short list of nominees?

READ: Gay Marriage Is Legal Everywhere! The Supreme Court Said So!

For one, there’s Kamala Harris, who’s making waves as the former district attorney of San Francisco and is planning on running for Barbara Boxer‘s Senate seat when she retires in 2017.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

Leah Ward Sears is also a contender being the first African-American female chief justice of Georgia’s Supreme Court.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

Along with being the first openly gay African-American federal judge, Deborah Batts, is currently sitting on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Judith Ann Wilson Rogers was nominated by then-President Bill Clinton in 1994 to replace Clarence Thomas on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

 

Lani Guinier is the first African-American female tenured professor at Harvard Law School.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

Vanessa Gilmore was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas in 1994.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

Janice Rogers Brown was considered a controversial nominee by President George W. Bush to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

A Black Woman Could Be the Next Supreme Court Justice - Jawbreaker

 

Do you think the next Supreme Court justice should be a Black woman?

Brittney Fennell

Brittney Fennell

Brittney is the Associate Editor of Jawbreaker and a writer who has goals to disrupt culture in ways unseen.